If a superior tells you “you need to leave your comfort zone”, then wrap-up and leave this company!

“Leaving the Comfort Zone” has been a cliché for a while. Since it’s popular, people use it just like people talk about “keynesian economy”, meaning that they basically use an established argument without even knowing what they are talking about. So, when someone writes about it, everybody applause with contempt on the face, and mostly no one don’t really know what we talk about…

typical comfort zone
typical comfort zone

“Leaving the Comfort Zone” has been a cliché for a while. Since it’s popular, people use it just like people talk about “keynesian economy”, meaning that they basically use an established argument without even knowing what they are talking about.

So, when someone writes about it, everybody applause with contempt on the face, and mostly no one don’t really know what we talk about…

The first thing I would love would be someone to step up and define accurately what is this “comfort zone” that so many people seem to be living with, regarding the fact that as for Gallup, 66% of the people working “are not engaged, or actively disengaged in their job”! Where is “the comfort” when you go to work for the paycheck?

Wake up in the morning, coffee, shower, leave your brain in a cupboard home, and go to work. Terrible fate!

What studies show, in a matter of fact, is that the popularity of the myth of “leaving the comfort zone”, is strangely correlated with the increasing number of chronic stress and burnout cases… Making people living 8 or 10 hours a day under pressure and anxiety is not a way of human management, neither explaining that people should be nice with a bossy-boss. This idea – making people working under anxiety – was already theorized by Robert M. Yerkes and John D. Dodson in… 1908! They were suggesting to make people “work on an optimal level of anxiety” beyond which performances would drop. Only problem: we are humans, and this “optimal” level doesn’t depend on a mechanic factor…

The second thing I would say is that, a sign of maturity at work is that you know what you are good at, what you can do properly, and with comfort. What my best clients do for everyone to be in an efficient comfort zone is training their people, before they land a position, positively assess the weaknesses, and help them filling the gap even before having to worry about their employee efficiency. They don’t just “complain”!

When you have an employee “malfunctioning”, it might be his fault for a part, but for a large part, it is the management chain’s! They were not able to anticipate the problem, and you know the sentence: “to govern means to foresee!” If a manager is not satisfied with your performance, he/she should be able to explain why, and not just complain. Is he/she not happy with your performance? Then make him/her show the numbers!

So what “leaving your comfort zone means”? It basically means that – some – companies don’t want to hire qualified people. They want under-average level people who will spend all their energy to keep the benefit of undeserved salary and position, and will be ready to do anything you ask them to do so. The more you work, the less you think. The less you think, the less you will question the organization. Come to a “seminar” on weekends, or it means “you don’t want to leave your comfort zone”, do bungee jumping session, or it means “you don’t want to leave your comfort zone”. This is not about comfort zone: it is about submission. Lots of companies like feudality more than efficiency.

That’s why, if the corporate culture is about “leaving your comfort zone”, just don’t join it, and if you did, then, leave it! My job is to help you to find the career that will make your life better, not to indicate you the highway to hell…

 

How to become a teacher in Thailand?

There are some not-so-difficult ways to work in Thailand, if you accept to have a reasonable salary, and if you are ready to prepare yourself to do so. One of them is to become a Teacher. In this article, we will be talking of becoming a language or any other academics teacher in schools, as well as becoming a University Teacher.

Jobs Opportunities in Asia: how to become a teacher in Thailand?

There are some not-so-difficult ways to work in Thailand, if you accept to have a reasonable salary, and if you are ready to prepare yourself to do so. One of them is to become a Teacher. In this article, we will be talking about becoming a language or any other academics teacher in schools, as well as becoming a University Teacher.

My Basic Career Recommendations.

If you are now working on your Career Project and have a little of time, as a High-School Student or a Career Transitioner; if your dream-job includes traveling the World and teach, then I highly recommend to get graduated in your favourite field. Languages are a good option, whatever happens. As an Online Advocate, I plead for the best online accredited Universities and trainings centres, article in which you will find the training websites I recommend for you to get a real degree, online.

General Requirements.

On a general point of view, to become a teacher in Thailand, you will need an accredited 4 years University Degree to teach in Schools and High Schools. To teach in Universities, you will then need a Master’s Degree. The diploma will usually have to be translated and certified: for this, I recommend you to have it done by a local agency, and to have it certified by your Embassy in Thailand. It usually takes few hours to few days.

You may basically teach anything in Thailand, as long as you meet the above requirements. Though, if you would like to teach anything else than languages, I recommend you to learn Thai prior to coming to Thailand. If you would like to be part of a group of Thai-Language Online Learners, you can pre-register here (Google form).

How to become an English Teacher in Thailand?

This topic is very popular. Lots of the visitors in Thailand speak English, and many think that teaching is an easy way to live here. Who doesn’t like kids, right?

To become an English Teacher in Thailand, your 4 years University Degree doesn’t need to be related with languages. Of course, it would be an advantage if you have one: you will have better chances to reach out better schools, and then get better work conditions, and especially a better salary!

You will also need either to be a Native English Speaker (“NES” status), which is defined by the Thai government as holding a passport from: USA, Canada, the UK, Ireland, Australia, or New Zealand, or prove your fluency in English (meaning a 600+ TOEIC, or a 5.5+ IELTS). Holding a TEFL or TESOL is a more and more common request. If you plan to work only in one Country in your life, you may plan not to have this certification. But if you plan to be a nomad, then I highly recommend to pass it: it will make your life way easier.

Where to do this TEFL / TESOL?

Well. There are many schools in Thailand or elsewhere offering those certifications. My own limitations are of two kinds: first, most of them are expensive, and even over-pricey (1,500 USD and more). Second, I believe that we have better to do than being locked in a class whole days, and that our learning cycles are different.

That is the reason why I recommend to go online. Until now, the best I found as an Online Learning centre is offering online and accredited TEFL Certificates. Premier TEFL offers all the TEFL trainings you may need, even blended. They also offer Paid Internships (it’s a “Work and Travel” Opportunity, with provided TEFL 120 hours courses, hours of class, free accommodation, and free weekends), and Jobs.

In my opinion, that is the best option if you want to save money, time, and keep walking!

How about other Languages?

Usually, you will need the local certification. If I take the example of my Country, there is a specific process: first, you need to pass a test at the Alliance Française, which will qualify you to follow the DAEFLE training (yes, you need to have a good French level to learn how to teach it!) Then, you follow the training operated either online by (only one) online Training Center, the CNED, or in person by an Alliance Française (it has a presence in most of the Countries), and then pass the exam. Once you have a DAEFLE, you can teach French mostly anywhere…

How about Visas and Work-Permit?

I am willing not to touch this specific point, as regulations may change and that I pointed out that Embassies have slightly different requirements when it comes to Visas. My best recommendation on this is to consider that “Google is your friend”: you just need to type “visa for – English – teacher in Thailand Thai Royal Embassy + Your Country” to get the updated information about it, like I did for South Africa, and then just got here… If you want to be a teacher, you need to learn how to do a little of research…

The standard procedure for you to work in Thailand will be first to obtain a non-B visa. Be Careful: such visas can be granted only by embassies (or consulates) outside of Thailand: you cannot change a tourist visa in a non-B visa inside Thailand. As it takes time to get the documentation and provide it to the Embassy (some of them accept copies, some others only original documents), and as the Embassies procedures may vary and take more or less time, you need to plan.

How much will you be paid?

Well, obviously, you won’t make a mint by being a teacher in Thailand. Usually in Thai Schools, where you have most of the chances to find the job, you will have a basic salary around 30,000 to 40,000 Baht, and quite often the lunch is provided. I know that some International schools provide some jobs, but most of the time, you will need to be a fellow-citizen, honestly. What’s more, the requirements are higher, especially in terms of experience.

You also may complete your long hours at schools (you will be required to stay at school, even during the hours you don’t teach) by private tuitions or tutoring. To be honest, even if it is a possibility to explore, don’t expect to buy your next Lamborghini with this: The average salary in Thailand is around 15,000 baht per month, so private tuitions for 500 baht per hour in the Country are not forcibly a great side-income. What you may try is to create your account on Fiverr and Upwork and try to sell your services there… But it is a highly competitive market…